Meryl Murman
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About

Mission Statement

I have always thought of my art practice as the place where I get to show my fangs in weird ways that wouldn’t be socially acceptable in waking life.

My art practice resides in the guts. It aims to liberate the feral body, the beast, trapped inside the cultural trance of the socially constructed being.

It begins from a place of curiosity and an affinity towards questions without answers.

It is where I can free my natural-won weird humor. Where I can allow many complex feelings and ideas to constantly attack each other, and where the duking out of extreme pain and extreme joy renders an absurd fun.

It is a personal practice for creating space in my life and for the artists who journey with me in inquiry, experimentation, and play. It is a space where we can exercise the body to access the portals to our own interiority, a doorway to the wild self, and to deeper consciousness and connection with our own unique passions and poetry.

The work is many eyed. It is a delicate tapestry woven together out of the the instincts and deep intuitions, the dreams, excitements, sadness, questions, longings and understandings of the many unique bodies I am so grateful to share my wanderings with.

Through a preoccupation with that which is messy, fragile, vulnerable and chaotic, it is a space to be in one’s body with certainty and pride regardless of the body’s gifts and limitations.

My art questions intimacy in the modern age, and therefore creating a space for a deeply beautiful mess of a journey with its audience is an essential obsession of mine.

I want the audience to care, and i want the audience to play, laugh, hold their breath and walk away with more questions and feeling a little bit like they just got off a roller coaster ride.

 Photo credit: Daryl Getman Dancers: Ryan Masson, Yanina Orellana, Julian Martinez, Liv Rush, Jake Harkey, Alan Perez Rehearsal for  ways of forgetting

Photo credit: Daryl Getman
Dancers: Ryan Masson, Yanina Orellana, Julian Martinez, Liv Rush, Jake Harkey, Alan Perez
Rehearsal for ways of forgetting

My art practice resides in the guts. It aims to liberate the feral body, the beast, trapped inside the cultural trance of the socially constructed being.

It begins from a place of curiosity and an affinity towards questions without answers.

It is where I can free my natural-won weird humor. Where I can allow many complex feelings and ideas to constantly attack each other, and where the duking out of extreme pain and extreme joy renders an absurd fun.

 Photo credit: Nick Shamblott Dancers: Ryan Masson, Yanina Orellana From the film  ways of forgetting

Photo credit: Nick Shamblott
Dancers: Ryan Masson, Yanina Orellana
From the film ways of forgetting

It is a personal practice for creating space for myself and the artists who journey with me in inquiry, experimentation, and play. It is a space where we can exercise the body to access the portals to our own interiority, a doorway to the wild self, and to deeper consciousness and connection with our own unique passions and poetry.

The work is many-eyed. It is a delicate tapestry woven together out of the instincts and deep intuitions, the dreams, excitements, sadness, questions, longings and understandings of the many unique bodies I am so grateful to share my wanderings with.

Through a preoccupation with that which is messy, fragile, vulnerable and chaotic, it is a space to be in one’s body with certainty and pride regardless of the body’s gifts and limitations.

My art questions intimacy in the modern age, and therefore creating a space for a deeply beautiful mess of a journey with its audience is an essential obsession of mine.

I want the audience to care, and I want the audience to play, laugh, hold their breath, walk away with more questions and feel a little bit like they just got off a roller coaster ride.