Meryl Murman

Performance/Lab: Light Moving Through Time

Performance/Lab: Light Moving Through Time

How does time affect our perception of movement?

Are there ways of framing figures that give more agency to the performing body within the artifact created from the figures labor?

Light Moving Through Time is a research project conducted through a series of labs by photographer Nick Shamblott and choreographer Meryl Murman that culminated in a performance, presentation, and published book of photographic research as part of Prospect 4 New Orleans on Feb 17th, 2018 at Art Klub.

The performance featured dancer Doron Perk and percussionist Roy Ben Yosef Timianker in a series of improvisational duets.

Through an inquiry into the mathematics and relationships between light, movement and long exposure photography, Light Moving Through Time explores our perceptual boundaries by experimenting with the, otherwise imperceptible, relationships and phenomenon that occur in movement as we dilate the period of time we observe/record it.

What is hidden by what we see? Ten short dance solos performed as an accumulation of the mutual vocabulary used between photographer and dancer during the process of collecting data were recorded onto film through ten long exposures. By treating time as a variable, the exposures recorded light over longer periods of time than our human perceptual systems are capable of processing, bringing into question the nature of seeing, processes for creating the reproducible image, and a layer of visibility to the labor of the subject of the photograph otherwise imperceptible.

The results are beautiful and evocative languages and unravellings themselves. The project is an exploration of image making that does not have the creation of an image as its primary goal, but rather a fluency in physical process and mathematical recording that translates from performance to systems of perception.

Through collecting and mapping the tensions and tempos of the human body in motion, these experiments have allowed for an exploration of a new mathematical equation for the representation of movement over photographic emulsion.

Photo credit: Nick Shamblott, dancer Ryan Masson

 Photo: Nick Shamblott  Dancer:  Ryuta Iwashita

Photo: Nick Shamblott
Dancer: Ryuta Iwashita

How does time affect our perception of movement?

Are there ways of framing figures that give more agency to the performing body within the artifact created from the figures labor?

Light Moving Through Time is a research project conducted through a series of labs by choreographer Meryl Murman and photographer Nick Shamblott that culminated in a performance, presentation, and published book of photographic research as part of Prospect 4 New Orleans on Feb 17th, 2018 at Art Klub.

  Dancer:  Doron Perk  Percussionist:  Roy Ben Yosef

Dancer: Doron Perk
Percussionist: Roy Ben Yosef

The performance featured dancer Doron Perk and percussionist Roy Ben Yosef Timianker in a series of improvisational duets.

Through an inquiry into the mathematics and relationships between light, movement and long exposure photography, Light Moving Through Time explores our perceptual boundaries by experimenting with the, otherwise imperceptible, relationships and phenomenon that occur in movement as we dilate the period of time we observe/record it.

 
  Dancer:  Doron Perk  Percussionist:  Roy Ben Yosef

Dancer: Doron Perk
Percussionist: Roy Ben Yosef

What is hidden by what we see? Ten short dance solos performed as an accumulation of the mutual vocabulary used between photographer and dancer during the process of collecting data were recorded onto film through ten long exposures. By treating time as a variable, the exposures recorded light over longer periods of time than our human perceptual systems are capable of processing, bringing into question the nature of seeing, processes for creating the reproducible image, and a layer of visibility to the labor of the subject of the photograph otherwise imperceptible.

 
 
  Dancer:  Ryan Masson

Dancer: Ryan Masson

The results are beautiful and evocative languages and unravellings themselves. The project is an exploration of image making that does not have the creation of an image as its primary goal, but rather a fluency in physical process and mathematical recording that translates from performance to systems of perception.

Through collecting and mapping the tensions and tempos of the human body in motion, these experiments have allowed for an exploration of a new mathematical equation for the representation of movement over photographic emulsion.